There is always that one bottle in the basket that is suitable for almost every type of occasion but has quite the rumors surrounding it. Dry white wine is an example of one such bottle in the basket, and there are almost countless assumptions that originate from its name, taste as well as its ingredients and uses. So let us take a moment to see and clear up (hopefully) some of those rumors. Let’s first start with the name “dry white wine”.

Most people assume that the term “dry” indicates that when you drink it, it leaves a dry aftertaste, which is not true. For a wine to give that dry aftertaste, it needs the ingredient known as “tannins”, so the name “dry” has nothing to do with the effects. Dry sustainable wine ingredients do not include residual sugar. So what does that mean? It means that it may not be as sweet as other wines, which does not mean that the wine is bland. It is widely misunderstood that dry white wine, not being sweet has no flavors, which cannot be more farther from the truth.

In fact, if you try to taste dry white wine, you will be able to taste fruits, just not sweetness. During the production of dry white wine, the winemaker keeps the fermentation long enough for the yeast to consume any and every sugar particles, so there is no sugar induced sweetness. Most wines contain alcohol, this is true. But let us clarify whether or not dry white wine contain higher amount of alcohol, which has been rumored time and time again.

It is understandable because of the fact that higher alcohol content means that you will not only taste only the fruits but also the alcohol itself. Now this taste lingers and can be termed as a “dry” wine taste. In fact, that has nothing to do with dry wines; a sweet wine can be high in alcohol and vice versa. So, tif you have cleared some of your doubts, you can go get yourself a bottle (you can cook with dry white wine as an ingredient too).